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Mummy-to-be: Scans Reveal Preserved Egyptian Woman in Warsaw Museum Was Pregnant

When the mummy first arrived in Warsaw in 1826, the remains were placed in a 1st century BCE coffin bearing the name of the priest Hor-Djehuty. It was assumed they were male, but it seems this isn’t the case…

Polish researchers from Warsaw University’s mummy project have made a surprise discovery after taking scans of a mummy that’s been on display at the capital’s National Museum since the 19th century…and thought to be male. It turns out the person was in fact female and a “mummy” in the literal sense after the images revealed she was pregnant when she passed away. 

Experts suggest the remains are likely of a high-status woman, aged between 20 and 30, who died during the 1st century BCE.

However, the scientists still can’t explain why the mummy, which first arrived to Poland in 1826, was placed in a 1st century BCE coffin bearing the name of the priest Hor-Djehuty. On top of that, the remains are said to have been discovered in royal tombs in Thebes in Upper Egypt in the early 19th century — which is still doubtful.

The mummy project started in 2015 to examine artefacts housed at the museum using new technologies such as computerised topography and 3D visualisation.

Check out Sputnik’s gallery to find out more about the mysterious discovery. 

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